Tag

slave labor

Labor that is coerced or forced and for which the laborers are not compensated. During the American founding, the country's economy was predominately dependent on slave labor, highlighting the contradiction inherent in professing liberty while owning slaves.

Tocqueville would later make a similar observation about the superior bounty of Northern farms.  He pointed out that the land and growing conditions just north and south of the Ohio River were identical in all respects except that the latter is cultivated by slaves.  The farms in Ohio, he claimed, were far more productive than those of Kentucky.  He argued that the existence of slavery demolishes the work ethic and impoverishes the population as a whole.

Annotated by luzzell on December 08, 2014

There was considerable disagreement at the time about the relative value of free labor over slave labor.  Those who were opposed to slavery generally insisted that slave labor was inferior (from a purely economical perspective) to free labor.  Delegates from the Deep South tried to counter that their slaves were just as efficient as the laborers of the North (and they deserved equal representation for their slaves for that reason), but they won few adherents to that belief.  See also, paragraphs 1226, 1227, 1284, and 2085.

Annotated by luzzell on September 05, 2013

Tocqueville would later make a similar observation about the superior bounty of Northern farms.  He pointed out that the land and growing conditions just north and south of the Ohio River were identical in all respects except that the latter is cultivated by slaves.  The farms in Ohio, he claimed, were far more productive than those of Kentucky.  He argued that the existence of slavery demolishes the work ethic and impoverishes the population as a whole.

Annotated by luzzell on September 05, 2013

There was considerable disagreement at the time about the relative value of free labor over slave labor.  Those who were opposed to slavery generally insisted that slave labor was inferior (from a purely economical perspective) to free labor.  Delegates from the Deep South tried to counter that their slaves were just as efficient as the laborers of the North (and they deserved equal representation for their slaves for that reason), but they won few adherents to that belief.  See also, paragraphs 1227, 1284, 2085, and 2755

Annotated by luzzell on September 05, 2013

There was considerable disagreement at the time about the relative value of free labor over slave labor.  Those who were opposed to slavery generally insisted that slave labor was inferior (from a purely economical perspective) to free labor.  Delegates from the Deep South tried to counter that their slaves were just as efficient as the laborers of the North (and they deserved equal representation for their slaves for that reason), but they won few adherents to that belief.  See also, paragraphs 1226, 1227, 1284, and 2755.

Annotated by luzzell on September 05, 2013

Tocqueville would later make a similar observation about the superior bounty of Northern farms.  He pointed out that the land and growing conditions just north and south of the Ohio River were identical in all respects except that the latter is cultivated by slaves.  The farms in Ohio, he claimed, were far more productive than those of Kentucky.  He argued that the existence of slavery demolishes the work ethic and impoverishes the population as a whole.

Annotated by luzzell on September 05, 2013

There was considerable disagreement at the time about the relative value of free labor over slave labor.  Those who were opposed to slavery generally insisted that slave labor was inferior (from a purely economical perspective) to free labor.  Delegates from the Deep South tried to counter that their slaves were just as efficient as the laborers of the North (and they deserved equal representation for their slaves for that reason), but they won few adherents to that belief.  See also, paragraphs 1226, 1227, 2085, and 2755.

Annotated by luzzell on September 05, 2013